Review: 100 Days of Sunlight by Abbie Emmons

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I’m going to start off by saying that I am sad. Sad because of how good this book could have been… And I feel like that is just the entire theme of my reading this year. I swear I say this for at least one book every month: IT HAD THE POTENTIAL AND THEY SHOULD HAVE WORKED IT OUT A LOT LONGER BEFORE PUBLISHING IT.

So I got an ARC of this book from NetGalley and was super excited to read it. I mean look at that cover, one of the prettiest covers I’ve seen in a while. It started off really good but in the end I had to rate it 2/5 stars.

This book is about a girl named Tessa who got into a car accident with her grandma which resulted in her being temporarily blind for can you guess? 100 days.

Tessa is a poetry blogger and so in an attempt to help her feel a little bit more normal again, her grandparents try to run an ad in the newspaper to find someone who can help her type the poems and publish them onto her blog.

In comes Weston, an amputee. He’s decided that this is the perfect opportunity to be treated like a completely normal person for the first time since he lost his legs. He asks Tessa’s grandparents to not tell her what has happened to him and together they work together as Tessa slowly recovers from the accident.

I’ll start off with the things that I did enjoy about the book:

The story was very sweet at times. I appreciated how close Tessa was with her grandparents and that she had a close group of internet friends that she found through her blogging. I also really liked Weston’s family aspect and how close he was to his brothers.

The writing was really pleasant to read and it was so easy to read that I flew through multiple chapters at a time when I actually had a chance to sit down and read this. I also liked that it was a pretty straightforward story with really no dilly dallying around the plot. It was short and got right through it all.

Also these are very small issues but if you’re looking for a book about blogging, this isn’t it. They basically talk about Tessa’s blog a total of three times. And it’s an extreme case of insta love.

And now… We get to the really big issues I had.

Both Tessa and Weston had extremely traumatic things happen to them. Tessa was in an accident that caused her to lose her vision and Weston had to have both of his legs amputated after getting an infection. And they were both left to just deal with the aftermath of that by themselves… I mean yes, they had their families but they never went to therapy, they never talked about therapy, it just didn’t happen.

When something traumatic happens your entire brain chemistry can change. The mental consequences of events like these are horrifying and I’m absolutely appalled that you could clearly see that both of these characters were suffering with PTSD like symptoms and yet were not ever treated like it was something that should be taken care of or evaluated. I mean Tessa had the chance of never being able to see again and they just decided “okay she can just learn how to deal with that if she doesn’t get her vision back”.

I mean, what would have happened if she didn’t get her vision back (which also I found that her getting her vision back immediately on Day 100 was so trite and predictable, really didn’t like that). If she had been permanently blinded she would have lost all hope that she had at her chance of recovery. That would have been devastated and her already fragile mental health would have been destroyed. I just think that the entire aspect of mental health was poorly written in order to have this incredibly preachy underlying message about how we all need to suck it up and get over our issues.

Here’s more on that, first with a quote:

“Everyone’s always treating me like I need help- and, sometimes, it’s hard to resist giving in. It’s hard to resist accepting what the world says about you… That you’ve got a disadvantage, a flaw, a problem. Because these days we’re told that it’s okay to let our problems control us. It’s okay to be the victim. It’s okay… because you have every right to be miserable.” I shook my head slowly, sweeping the room with my gaze.

“But I want to tell you that it’s not okay. It’s not okay to let your problem stop you from doing anything you want to do. It’s not okay to be your problem… because you’re a person”

I mean like the line on the cover says… “When life knocks you down… Get up” it just breaks me knowing how many people out there want you to feel like you are not allowed to feel the way that you feel. No, you can’t live every single day of your life miserable but you can’t go around acting like everything is peachy keen, sometimes you are the victim. Sometimes you are completely broken down. Sometimes you feel like giving up. And you know what? I’m here telling you that that is okay. We can’t possibly have everything together all the time.

Sometimes, our handicaps, our hurts, our abuses… Sometimes they win. And no those problems are not who we are but they are a part of us and we can’t ignore them in order to make everyone else around us think better of us. Sometimes we get knocked down and we can’t get back up again for a while. And I really, really don’t appreciate how this book preaches to the fact that we shouldn’t feel bad for what is wrong with us. I’m sorry but I will never be fully strong. I will never fully win. And I am incredibly angry that this book is trying to tell me that I am pathetic, yes it makes me feel pathetic, for feeling the way that I do.

There’s another line very early on in the book that says something along the lines of “no one ever sees the light by being told that someone else is dealing with something darker” and THAT is what I wanted to see more of. I have been told time and time again in my life that there are people out there that have it worse than me and that I’m not allowed to feel the way that I do because of that. I don’t know if I’m just being overly sensitive but it really hurt me to have Weston talk the way that he did despite never doing anything for himself to get help about his mental health other than deciding that he needed to essentially “man up” and just do whatever he wanted no matter what anyone else thought.

I just don’t understand how this author can go from writing a beautiful line like that to preaching that we aren’t allowed to be miserable about what is wrong with us. Especially because right after that quote Weston basically plays the victim saying that he can’t possibly be with Tessa because he’s an amputee. It just made no sense to me. I mean if Weston doesn’t want people to treat him like his handicap then he can’t act like that when that finally comes up.

I just think the story overall was so immature and absolutely poorly told in both cases of disability. I really wish that I hadn’t read this book because I know I’m going to get angry every single time I think about it.

I think that this book puts out a really entitled message and I’m really disappointed. This is not a book that I would recommend. I really wish that this book had been different.

I also wanted to share a link to another review that touched on some things that I didn’t talk about here. You can find that here.

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Review: The Right Swipe by Alisha Rai

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Apparently, romance does still have the potential to melt my cold, dead heart. Y’all, this book was so good. I got an eARC of The Right Swipe by Alisha Rai from NetGalley to review here.

This book centers around Rhiannon, an extremely cynical dating app creator who helped to revolutionize the dating scene. She got burned by a mystery match who ghosted her and then ends up finding out he’s a famous ex-football player and working with another dating website. She fumbles around with the idea of giving him a second chance and going against everything she believes about love and relationships. 

I found myself relating to how hard and cold Rhiannon is to love for herself and yet enjoying seeing it flourish in other people. Every single character was so unique and diverse. The main character is black, the love interest (Samson) is Samoan. Rhiannon’s assistant is a lesbian, her best friend is plus sized and has agoraphobic anxiety (I really really really hope that Alisha Rai does spin off stories of some of these side characters). One of Samson’s friends is a stay-at-home dad.

To me, these characters are coming up on that level of unique that I felt in Red, White, and Royal Blue by Casey McQuiston and honestly that’s all I could ask for from side characters.

The relationships in this were also all so good. Friendships, family, and love, just all very healthy and strong and I ate it up. There were also much deeper storylines regarding feminism, concussions in football, and toxic/abusive relationships and sexual harassment.

I hope it comes as no surprise that I rated it 5/5 stars! This was such a breath of fresh air after some of the not so great and sad books I’ve read recently. It was such a kick ass story and I am definitely going to be picking up my own copy of this soon!

One of the things about this story that I absolutely loved more than anything was how well Samson handled learning about Rhiannon’s “baggage”. How he just accepted all the trust issues she had and went with whatever she felt comfortable with. Like when she couldn’t handle being called by her full name, Samson immediately got himself to call her Rhi and never once tried to act like he could change the way she felt about her full name during intimate moments.

And at the end of the book when he said that he would take her as is trust issues and all? Guys, I bawled. Samson was such a sweet and caring man and even when he was getting down and dirty in bed he was still a good man.

If Alisha Rai writes more books in this universe of characters I will definitely be picking them up!

I would recommend this book to you if you like romance with slightly deeper plots, really sweet romance, and aren’t the biggest fan of smut. This definitely had some smutty scenes but it wasn’t overly done in my mind (I’m very picky with romance books in that sense). Also, if you’re like me and lean towards the cynical side when it comes to love and romance, see if this book can melt some of that ice cold heart for you too 😉

This book is out today so you can pick up a copy of your own at the links below if you’re interested!

Amazon // Barnes and Noble // Book Depository

Review: Sadie by Courtney Summers

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Last night I finished reading Sadie by Courtney Summers. I’d seen it a few times in various BookTube videos and was intrigued by the cover, 100% a judging the book by the cover situation, and checked it out from my library’s digital collection.

This book is written in an unconventional format told in two perspectives. One perspective is that of a podcast, titled “The Girls”, unfolding the story of Sadie and her sister Mattie as the host gathers more and more information. The second perspective is of Sadie herself, one of the missing girls. I’m a really big fan of stories that have odd formats, it makes it more intriguing to read and so when I saw that this was partly told through a podcast format I was even more excited to read it.

I for one, went into this book knowing nothing about the plot and I find that for mystery/thriller/crime type books that’s really the best way for me to go. If I know too much about the story I find myself trying to predict every twist and turn and end up ruining the book for myself. However, if you do want to know what the book is about here’s the blurb from Goodreads 🙂 –

A missing girl on a journey of revenge. A Serial―like podcast following the clues she’s left behind. And an ending you won’t be able to stop talking about.

Sadie hasn’t had an easy life. Growing up on her own, she’s been raising her sister Mattie in an isolated small town, trying her best to provide a normal life and keep their heads above water.

But when Mattie is found dead, Sadie’s entire world crumbles. After a somewhat botched police investigation, Sadie is determined to bring her sister’s killer to justice and hits the road following a few meager clues to find him.

When West McCray―a radio personality working on a segment about small, forgotten towns in America―overhears Sadie’s story at a local gas station, he becomes obsessed with finding the missing girl. He starts his own podcast as he tracks Sadie’s journey, trying to figure out what happened, hoping to find her before it’s too late.

After reading it, I decided to rate it 5/5 stars. There were very few bits that I found myself disliking and I honestly really enjoyed how it ended. I know that there were a lot of people taking off entire stars from their reviews because it was such an open ending but I felt like it was perfect. We don’t always get the endings in life that we want, nor does that happen in books. It felt more realistic to me than if we would’ve had some big happy ending. I felt that justice was served and that was really what Sadie had set out for to begin with. I’m trying to keep this vague to keep from spoiling it too much.

Content warnings for: pedophilia and sexual abuse, assault, murder

I think that this book did a really good job of showing just how hard it is to survive in small towns where no one ever seems to really succeed. That class difference can cause so many issues and is extremely painful to read about. It was really hard to read about how hard Sadie tried to provide a good life for her little sister. How hard she worked to protect her over her lifetime and it broke my heart even more as I read further into the story and found out more and more about the backstory of Sadie and Mattie.

If you are a fan of audiobooks I would recommend picking this one up. I read that it was a full cast audiobook and with the podcast aspect I think that would be a really cool way to experience that. If you’re a fan of true crime type podcasts at all I would recommend checking this book out. It was not an easy read in the slightest but it was such a good story that I know that I’m going to continue thinking about it.

This book was dark and sad and truly a story worth reading. If you’re interested in picking up a copy of your own here are a few links:

Amazon // Barnes and Noble // Book Depository

 

Review: Fix Her Up by Tessa Bailey

Fix Her Up

Fix Her Up by Tessa Bailey is a “romantic comedy” about Georgie Castle and Travis Ford, childhood friends that have decided to fake date to look more adult to those around them in their hometown and beyond. It’s a smutty mess and doesn’t compare to the description that’s listed on Goodreads whatsoever!! (Can you tell I’m salty about having actually read this book or is that just me?)

This book had been raved about by multiple people that I follow and then two people absolutely hated it. I had just gotten my copy from the library and decided to pick it up and see where I stood on it.

I ultimately rated it 2/5 stars because the plot didn’t align with what I went in expecting it to be, the romance felt toxic, and the timing felt completely screwy throughout the entire book. There were very few things that I actually enjoyed.

The rest of the review contains spoilers.

The plot was supposed to be a fake dating plot but there wasn’t a single part of it that felt like it was actually them fake dating. The more that I think about the more that I realize that there wasn’t a single aspect of this book that was truly fleshed out. It jumped around from one plot point to another so fast that I just got tired of reading. I ended up skimming the last 75 or so pages because I was so bored.

So much of the summary on Goodreads is about a life makeover… There was no true makeover scene, it maybe lasted three pages, if that. And that in and of itself was frustrating because it seemed like Georgie had her own style and was comfortable with that. Why change it? It was the stereotypical “girl wears not so flattering clothes so must change and start wearing sexier clothes to be appealing to literally anyone”. The girl “club” the Just Us league or whatever that they created was hardly a club. They really didn’t do anything other than sit and chat. It felt like it was just thrown in there to add some form of “feminist” tones even though they mostly just talked crap about the guys in their lives.

The timing was nonexistent. There was absolutely no transition that indicated a passing of time. It felt like one never-ending day even though I know that more time passed than that.

I found the romance in this incredibly cringey. It made me so uncomfortable that Travis spent so much of the book telling himself that he couldn’t be attracted to Georgie because of the fact that she had grown up as the the “dorky little sister”. It just felt like he was infantilizing her and it really didn’t help that he continuously called her “baby girl”. In general I find pet names really cringey but the two aspects paired together made me feel kind of gross. They didn’t even last more than a few chapters before the whole “no sex while we’re fake dating” thing went out the window. I don’t know why they didn’t just agree to be friends-with-benefits from the beginning and just ham up the romantic stuff for the paparazzi.

The romance between the side characters felt completely thrown in there too. I felt like Georgie’s brother had a very toxic relationship with his wife, he very clearly wanted kids and it sounds like she didn’t and was getting him to stay with her by stringing him along letting him think she’ll agree to have kids someday. It skeeved me out too when Georgie’s mom played “wing woman” so that Georgie and Travis could go do it in the pool house (omg the amount of public or semi public sex disturbed me too, don’t do that y’all, it’s not sexy), like her mom acted like she just wanted her daughter to get some. I can understand being supportive of the relationship but ew?

Even for the people that love smutty scenes I don’t really see any sort of redemption from them. Travis was grossly controlling and dominating and while yes there are relationships in which stuff like that works, it always needs to be discussed beforehand and safety always has to be a priority. I’m not saying that anything went out of hand or that anything bad happened but with the way that everything else was talked about (including the fact that her virginity was a main component of all the sexual stuff) it felt like Travis was borderline taking advantage of Georgie. One line that really stuck out to me was when Georgie was described as this “man’s pleasure tool”… Um no, I’m sorry but women aren’t for being used for men’s pleasure.

And how overly sexualized Travis was? Ew. He truly had no redeeming qualities. He treated Georgie like his savior which is absolutely bullshit. Women do not need to fix men. This book should’ve been called “Fix Him Up” with how much work needs to be done with Travis. It genuinely made me mad at how much Travis viewed Georgie as his “savior”. I think Georgie was young and is still in the midst of finding her footing in the world and figuring out who she is and what she wants. She’s only 23!! Also I enjoyed that she realized the potential that he clown business had by working to expand it to a full on party business but again, none of that was really fleshed out. All the side plots and side characters were so secondary to this overly sexualized lusty relationship. I hated the ending so much because it was so rushed and seriously, I get that you’ve known the guy since you were a kid but WHY are you agreeing to marry him??? And given that there really was no time frame in this I have no idea how long they fake dated but I just feel like this was the worst way that this could have ended. Way, way too soon to get engaged.

I think this book might end up being one of the biggest, if not biggest disappointments of the year. Despite going into it with slightly adjusted expectations because of the negative reviews that I saw the description itself sounds like a completely different book than what ended up in my hands. This book had the potential to be something really good and it just wasn’t. It could have been a sweet, steamy, well developed romance and all it was was a giant mess. All I want to do is send this book back to the editor and ask how the hell they let this get published as is.

I really don’t recommend this book. If you’ve read it, what did you think of it? I’m still trying to find a romance book that impresses me, but it feels like everything I’ve read has something that just grinds my gears by the end of it.

I’ll be back on Sunday with an update for Camp NaNoWriMo and shocker, it won’t be great! Have a great weekend everyone.

 

Review: Radio Silence

So I read Radio Silence by Alice Oseman and IT RIPPED ME TO SHREDS.

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Like honestly from about the halfway point to the end of the book I cried for the majority of my time reading. The story was just incredibly cathartic for me and I wish so much that I could have read this back in high school but I’m glad that it made it’s way to me now.

For those of you who have not heard of Radio Silence here’s a short little summary:

Frances spends most of her time studying and working towards her goal of university. That’s been her self proclaimed path since she was young. Then she gets presented the opportunity to create artwork for her favorite podcast and everything begins to change.

She meets a new friend and can finally begin to act like herself. And then the trust that had built up between them is shattered and Frances has to work to find a way to fix what has been broken and find out what path she really needs to take with her life.

I’m really bad at summaries, so here’s the link to the Goodreads page for the book.

I rated Radio Silence 5/5 stars, however, when I started this book I was unimpressed which I was kind of shocked about (but obviously in the end my entire opinion changed). I’d heard this book hyped up for months (mainly from Kat from the youtube channel paperbackdreams) and I was so excited to pick it up that I ended up reading almost all of it in a day. Like I was reading it the entire time that I was at work. I found the writing style incredibly unlikeable and I’m not sure if it just happened to change the further into the book I got or if I just got used to it but after about the first 100 pages I was paying any attention to the writing style anymore. I will say though that I feel like most of this book was written by “telling” and not “showing” and I think that’s my main gripe with the writing.

The deeper into the story I got, the more I found myself relating to Frances and the more it broke my heart. There were so many times where I almost had to set the book aside because it just brought back so many painful memories for me from my childhood up until now. I think that for anyone who has ever felt like they just don’t quite fit in would relate to Frances. And anyone who has ever gone through something that has left them questioning their entire future would enjoy this as well.

I would have loved to read more about the podcast, it seemed very Welcome to Nightvale to me! I also would have appreciated for the ending to have been stretched a bit more, I felt like there could have been points in the middle that would easily have been taken out in order to accommodate for more closure at the end. I just wish I could have seen a bit more happiness come out of an otherwise incredibly emotional book. Again, though, I think it was only this emotional because I felt like I could have been living a mixture of Frances and Aled’s lives. I related so much to this story that I feel like I don’t know how to talk about it without starting to cry about my own life experiences.

Anyways, there’s a decent amount of representation (bi, asexuality, one of the podcast characters is agender, the main character is mixed race) in this book but I feel like most of it is essentially mentioned in a sentence or two and then we just move past it. Like I was super excited for asexuality rep and then there was one paragraph about it at the very end and that was it. Although if I force myself to think about it, these kids are 17-18 years old and honestly who isn’t still figuring stuff out at that point? So I kind of get there being so many brief instances of explanation because I know at that age I sure as hell wouldn’t be talking about being asexual to anyone.

Again, I would highly recommend this book to anyone: teens, young adults, and even adults. I definitely though urge teens and young adults to pick up this book. Especially if you have ever experienced the push to try and take a path that you have questioned. Especially if you feel like you have ever been the odd one out. And especially if you have ever had the experience of meeting someone who you can be truly you around and then losing them because that story line is the one that killed me the most.

If you’re interested in picking this up I’ve added some links to places that you can purchase the book here:

Amazon (this is an affiliate link!)

Barnes and Noble

Book Depository

And if any of you have read this book, what did you think of it? I’d love to chat with you about it!

Review: Red, White, & Royal Blue

Happy Monday everyone! I’m back today with a review about Red, White, & Royal Blue by Casey McQuiston!

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Holy wow. This might just be a post about me gushing about how much I loved this book and honestly I don’t even care. I finished this book on Saturday and had to hold off on posting this post until now because I didn’t want to jump the gun!

Warning you now that this post will contain spoilers and an affiliate link!

So I’m not sure if you have seen this book going around the internet as much as I have but it seems like every single person that I follow that has read it absolutely can’t stop gushing about the book. I also began following the author on Twitter because she seems so sweet and I just wanted to participate in the excitement surrounding this book!

My spoiler free review of this book is as follows:

Red, White, & Royal Blue is a stunning debut novel by Casey McQuiston. The story is emotional, endearing, eye-opening, and euphoric. (Once I had those first two “e” words I couldn’t stop lol). Every character is unique and so real that I found myself wanting to read entire novels about each and every person mentioned within these pages. I laughed, and cried (and cried), and found myself squealing on more than one occasion. This is a story about love conquering in the midst of so many obstacles and I highly recommend this book to anyone. 5/5 stars!

If you don’t already own this book, you can purchase the book here if you’re interested, I truly recommend reading this book however you can get your hands on it! I really wish I didn’t have to return my copy to the library already but I’m going to try and order my own copy soon! I’m already thinking about rereading it.

Anyways… Now on to the spoilers.

Discussing spoilers from here on out. Enter at your own risk. 

Continue reading

Review: If Only

I was provided a copy of If Only by Melanie Murphy from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

So I’ll start off by saying that this post will contain spoilers. If you want to read my (short) spoiler free review you can check it out at this link on my Goodreads. I rated it 2/5 stars. I would recommend this book to people who like slow burn romances, the realness of someone who doesn’t have their entire life together, a little magic, and a lot of lessons.

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NOW ENTERING THE SPOILER ZONE

Continue reading

Review: Lilac Girls

Lilac Girls by Martha Hall Kelly is the harrowing tale of three women during World War II and their interweaving stories that take place over the course of more than a decade. It is based off of real people, real stories, though the dialogue has been fabricated by the author. The women in this story are Caroline, a New York socialite, Kasia, a Polish teenager, and Herta, a young German doctor. Caroline Ferriday and Herta Oberheuser were real people while Kasia (and her sister Zuzanna) were created by and based off of women who had been imprisoned in Ravensbruck, like Kasia and Zuzanna.

I devoured this book in about two days when I finally sat down to actually read it. I bought it last year and on multiple occasions I was tempted to just declutter it and now that I’ve read it I am so glad that I didn’t.

The period of time that this book is based off of, World War II, is one of my favorite parts of history to learn about. And although I am so passionate about learning about it, reading of the atrocities that occurred to so many people just never gets easier. This story was no exception. It was heart wrenching and painful and beautiful all at once, I found myself experiencing every emotion as I turned the pages, I truly couldn’t read this fast enough.

From here onwards contains spoilers… But, before you go (if you don’t want to see the spoilers) if you haven’t gotten a copy of this book, I urge you to pick one up and read it. It’s a stunning story that I won’t soon forget and I will be recommending it to absolutely everyone from here on out. Here’s a link to purchase.

Caroline, from the beginning, was a striking heroine. She is headstrong and passionate and oh boy do I wish I could have met her in real life. As a side note, the second book that Kelly wrote is a prequel about Caroline’s mother called Lose Roses and I am so excited to get my hands on this book soon! And though I found her storyline with Paul to be somewhat interesting, I couldn’t help but just want to go back to hearing more about the work she was doing. I really loved how the romance aspects of this book didn’t overpower the other messages. It was incredibly realistically written.

Herta was a complicated character. I wanted to hate her, I really did but I couldn’t help but find bits of sympathy hidden in my disgust for her actions. She was so disillusioned to the horrible work she was doing, so passionate to be doing the work of the Reich and Hitler. It gives me chills just thinking about how people could believe that these murders and experiments were just. The small parts of her inner turmoil that were shown, with the cutting, helped to humanize her and I felt empathy in those moments, she felt like she was doing her job and yet felt not right. Her suicide attempt was one part of the book that I had to skip but I saw it coming from a mile away. She knew she was in the wrong and I think deep down she realized that she could’ve backed out when she first had to administer the lethal injections. She chose to keep working even after feeling initial disgust and for that I feel no sympathy.

And finally, Kasia. She was such a painful character to read. So young and naive to be caught up in such turmoil and disaster. Her mindset so stuck in her ways that it was obvious that despite her older self saying that she wasn’t damaged, she was truly hurt psychologically by Ravensbruck. Her inability to let things go and to want to change and fix things, it just broke my heart. Seeing her fall apart slowly despite so many things going right was incredibly difficult to read and I just wanted to reach into the book and grab her, shake her, and take her to a therapist. I think that seeing what she was going through after being liberated was something that needed to be seen. Recovery from any sort of traumatic event is difficult and the fact that Kasia was trying to just return to a normal life is absolutely evidence that sometimes you really can’t do that. Everyone suffers and recovers in their own way but everyone needs help and everyone should try and accept help.

The ending was pretty open and I didn’t mind that. Not every story needs to be wrapped up with a pretty bow and this was definitely one of those stories. Though I would have appreciated knowing what the hell Paul wrote in his letters, Caroline. But that’s beside the point.

I truly could not recommend this book enough. And I’m totally on that post reading a great book high and just want to shout from the rooftops about this book but I was truly wowed by this book.

So please, please, please, buy this book and read it and learn these stories. There are few things I push more than learning about our past, learning about the bad that happened in this world because how else are we supposed to prevent ourselves from doing something this bad again.

PS… This post contains affiliate links!

Review: Again, But Better

Today I’m going to be reviewing Again, But Better by Christine Riccio.

Here’s the synopsis:

Shane has been doing college all wrong. Pre-med, stellar grades, and happy parents…sounds ideal—but Shane’s made zero friends, goes home every weekend, and romance…what’s that?

Her life has been dorm, dining hall, class, repeat. Time’s a ticking, and she needs a change—there’s nothing like moving to a new country to really mix things up. Shane signs up for a semester abroad in London. She’s going to right all her college mistakes: make friends, pursue boys, and find adventure!

Easier said than done. She is soon faced with the complicated realities of living outside her bubble, and when self-doubt sneaks in, her new life starts to fall apart.

Shane comes to find that, with the right amount of courage and determination one can conquer anything. Throw in some fate and a touch of magic—the possibilities are endless.

Prethoughts to reading this:

I am SO excited. I feel like I’m going to end up inserting myself into this book and loving it a bit too much, I did the same thing with Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell. I studied abroad in London and I miss it so much and I already feel like I relate to Shane and her college “inexperience”.

I just read Christine’s note at the beginning and my heart swelled. If this story is what she says it is it’s going to be so great. Reading about someone who hasn’t “done it all” by 20 is going to be revolutionary for EVERYONE who has ever felt less than for not doing what it seems like everyone else is doing.

I got an autographed copy and I honestly still feel so hesitant about annotating books that are hardcovers or that are signed. It gives me so much anxiety even though it’s my own book that I spent my money on and I don’t loan books to people anymore so honestly, why should I care?

I’m also really nervous because I can’t help but wonder if this is going to be a really bad youtuber book but maybe this will change my mind from those thoughts. It’s just really frustrating to see things get so hyped up and then getting disappointed…

Okay… Today is March 8, 2019 and I am beginning Again, But Better… Let’s do this!

Immediate thoughts after finishing this the same day I began reading it:

I honestly don’t know how I feel about this. I want to both love it and hate it at the same time. The story was just what I needed to read right now but at the same time there were so many things that made me either uncomfortable or just feel not happy with the general story.

Non-spoiler review:

After some long thoughts about this I’m rating the book 3/5 stars. Leaning somewhat towards a 3.5/5 stars but I’m rounding down because I just don’t know how I feel. There were some parts of this book that bothered me but I’ll touch on those in the spoilery section.

I loved how this read like a movie, it felt so real to me, I can definitely see Christine’s film background in this. Another thing I really liked was the banter between characters. I found myself chuckling quite a bit at the things they said to each other.

Now, would I have bought this book and read it had I not been following Christine? Yes, 100%. The book itself had a plot that interested me greatly. It was a story that sounded like I could relate to it and in the end it was. It showed a lot about learning about yourself and learning how to be your own person. It showed hard lessons to learn and how important second chances can be. Would I recommend this book? Yes. I think if you’re looking for a quick contemporary read then definitely check this out. This wasn’t the story of my dreams but even going into it with very low expectations that I would like it I was pleasantly surprise.

And lastly, I got one of the first copies that was printed so the end of her note says 2018 instead of Christine and I will be giggling about that for years to come.

Next I’ll be moving into a more in depth review with spoilers included…

SPOILERS AHEAD: STOP READING NOW IF YOU HAVEN’T READ THE BOOK AND DON’T WANT TO BE SPOILED

Continue reading

Review: Whisper to Me

Whisper to Me by Nick Lake is about a girl who hears a voice and the 500 page apology email that she sends to this boy explaining why she is the way she is.

I was not a fan of this book at all. It’s over 500 pages long and I skimmed over half of it.

I give it 1/5 stars and do not recommend it to anyone.

I think the formatting of the book was really jumpy, I know it was supposed to mimic an email but to read it in book form was really confusing. I think it could have been improved if it were an actual back and forth email between Cassie and this boy instead of just one long email from Cassie trying to explain herself to this boy.

I didn’t get the whole gist of the relationship between Cassie and this boy but I was really not a fan of how it was written. I was really disappointed in the fact that the author portrayed Cassie as being “cured” when the boy was around. This is one of those YA tropes that I can’t stand! Guys are not the answer to mental health help.

Now if I was this boy, I would not be excited to read 500 pages of this story. There was a lot of this story that could have been cut out. A lot of details and side stories that I felt were unnecessary. The first 200 pages or so were decently written and I was interested in the story, but then it started to drag on and on and I got tired of reading the same things over and over again.

Overall, I think this book was poorly written and a poor representation of recovery from a mental illness. Lake doesn’t even properly label it a mental illness and Cassie takes her recovery into her own hands instead of consulting professionals. She hides what is going on with her and lies to multiple people about what she’s doing with her treatment.

Again, I don’t recommend this book at all.

Hope you all have a great Tuesday.